It’s An Acquired Taste: How Knowledge Drives Aesthetics | Arthur P. Shimamura Ph.D.: Psychology Today

“Bebop, abstract art, sushi…people often say that it takes time to appreciate such things—that they are acquired tastes. Psychologically speaking, what does it mean for something to be uninteresting or even distasteful at first but then with time, gain in appreciation? In art, many styles when first encountered looked so perverse that their very status as “art” was questioned. Incredibly, this sentiment was true for Impressionist paintings as many 19th century beholders thought such works were ugly and crude. Even its namesake was based on a sarcastic review by Louis Leroy, a critic who in 1874 saw Claude Monet’s Impression, Sunrise and remarked: “Wallpaper in its embryonic state is more finished than that seascape.” To read the rest of the article, click here: It’s An Acquired Taste: How Knowledge Drives Aesthetics | Psychology Today

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s